Curry: Red Curry Roast Duck

Ingredients for 4 servings

1/2 Chinese roast duck, chopped into small pieces

4 kaffir lime leaves, deveined and torn into 3 pieces

2 cups unsweetened coconut milk

2 tbsp fish sauce

1 tsp sugar

20 red or green seedless grapes stemmed

10 cherry tomatoes

1/4 red pepper cut into 1/2-inch strips

30 fresh basil leaves

2 1/2 freshly steamed rice

Preparation

Trim excess fat form the duck pieces and carve some of thick bones off the leg parts. Discard the bones. Do not use the drumstick ends because they are too bulky for the recipe. Set aside.

Heat 1 cup of the coconut milk in a wok on high heat until it boils. Add red curry paste and stir for 1 minute to dissolve. Add duck pieces and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add lime leave fish sauce and sugar and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add grapes and cherry tomatoes and stir-fry for 30 seconds.

Add the rest of the coconut milk and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add red peppers and 20 of basil leaves and stir-fry for 1 minute. Transfer into a large serving bowl and garnish with the rest of the basil leaves. Serve immediately with steamed rice.

Cookbook: Thai Food

Renowned chef David Thompson first went to Thailand by mistake: a holiday plan had to be changed at the last minute, and he ended up in Bangkok, where he was seduced by the people, culture, and cuisine. Since that fateful trip some 20 years ago, Thailand has become David’s second home. Working alongside cooks who perfected their craft in the Thai royal palaces, he began to document the traditional recipes and culinary techniques that have been handed down from generation to generation. The result is THAI FOOD, the most comprehensive account of this ancient and exotic cuisine ever published in English. David writes about Thailand and its food with an easy erudition, encouraging readers to cook and experiment, while simultaneously fostering a respect for the food and its stewardship through the ages. Although all the classic, well-loved recipes are here, this magnum opus features hundreds of lesser-known but equally authentic and delicious Thai dishes that will inspire cooks to go beyond green curry chicken and Thai fish cakes. David’s passion and conviction are infectious; complemented by Earl Carter’s superb photography, THAI FOOD captures all aspects of the dynamic Thai culture and cuisine.• Ten years in the making, this groundbreaking work is one of the cookbook publishing events of the decade.• The author’s London restaurant, nahm, received a Michelin star in 2002, making it the first Thai restaurant to receive such an honor.• Photographed at David’s restaurants in Sydney and London, and on location in Thailand, Earl Carter’s superb images capture both the essence of Thai food and its rich cultural milieu.  Awards2003 James Beard Award Winner2003 IACP Award WinnerReviews“Stands out, dauntingly massive, brilliantly magisterial, and, at the same time, bustling with charm, observations, life.†—Saveur “[S]et a new standard for Asian cookbooks.â€â€”Saveur (Top 100 Home Cook Edition)
This collection of Thai cooking lore, history and recipes can be as daunting as it is comprehensive. A description of the country, its various socioeconomic groups (called muang) and its culinary history is lengthy and perhaps a little too in-depth. While Thompson’s enthusiasm for his subject is palpable, readers may be anxious to get to the actual recipes, but the first one does not appear for nearly 200 pages, after an essay on Thai superstitions and a glossary of ingredients such as bai yor, a tobacco-like plant, and dried lily stalks. The recipes are thorough and authentic, and while they call for many items that may be hard to find, Thompson good-naturedly provides alternatives to most of them. Thailand’s signature strong flavors are in evidence in dishes such as Bream Simmered with Pickled Garlic Syrup and a Salad of Pork, Young Ginger and Squid. Recipes are divided sensibly into soups, curries, salads and the like, but one chapter simply titled “Menus” contains various dishes that work together to form a traditional Thai meal (menus such as one that includes Prawn and Lemongrass Relish; Egg Mousse with Pineapple, Corn and Salted Duck Eggs; and Deep-Fried Bean Curd with Crab, Pork and Spring Onions are intriguing). A chapter on snacks and street foods offers additional tasty choices such as Rice Cakes with Chili, Prawn and Pork Sauce and Egg Nets, lacy crˆpe-like wrappers created by drizzling beaten egg into a hot wok that are stuffed with a pork and shrimp mixture. The dessert chapter also provides instructions for creating Smoked Water, flavored using a special candle with a wick on both ends.

 

 

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Complete Food Companion: * PointsPlus values for just about any food you can think of (over 20,000 foods!). * An easy-to-use complete A-Z food list and their PointsPlus values. * Weight Watchers Power Foods listings indicate the healthy, nutritious foods that help stave off hunger * Brand name food products, organized by food category to help make finding food products quick and easy! * Weight Watchers Food Products listings, a comprehensive guide to all your favorite Weight Watchers food products Dining Out Companion * An easy-to-use A-Z list with hundreds of dining out foods * Menu items from 140 national restaurants with their PointsPlus values * PointsPlus values values for favorite ethnic and regional dishes Ultimate 3 Month Tracker * Monitor your daily and weekly progress * Includes tips & recipes * A great motivating tool to track your success Points Plus Calculator with Daily & Weekly PointsPlus Tracker * Easily calculates PointsPlus values for your food! * Calculates your daily PointsPlus Target * Tracks your daily & weekly PointsPlus values Ready, Set, Go! Cookbook * 125 Easy Meals to get you started * Exclusive cookbook only available through the Deluxe Kit * All Recipes have 8 PointsPlus value or less! Blue Zippered Binder * Holds everything in one place with mesh velcro pockets & a place to hold your pen!

 

 

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    Kaffir Lime Leaves: Kaffir Lime News in New York Times

    Kaffir Lime Leaves.com mentioned in the NYtimes.com

    I am thankful to David Tanis for mentioning about my website kaffirlimeleaves.com in the nytimes.com today.  By the way, he wrote a wonderful blog about the kaffir lime leaves as well as their fruits.  Here is the link to the blog.

    Of course, you find a lot of them and other kinds of citrus in  Southeast Asia .  The fruits and leaves are very useful for cooking and other home remedies.  You can use the rinds for cooking too, but you don’t want to leaves them  in the pot so long.  They would give a bitter taste if you eat them.  You might want to pick them up after a few minutes in the pot.  Some folks, especially women,  use the rinds for having a great looking skin.  The fruit juice can be used to shampoo your hair.  It leaves a clean and soft texture.  For the salad and the fish cake, young kaffir lime leaves are preferred.

    Even though some cooking recipes mentioned that you can substitute the kaffir lime leaves with lemon grass or lemon grass mixed with lime zest.  They are not even close  kaffir lime leaves because the fragrance is total different.  It is unique and one of a kind.

    Keep in mind though the fresh kaffir lime leaves are much better than dried ones.  Those dried ones tend to lose the fragrance which is important in Thai cooking.  You can use them for substitute, but not quite like the fresh ones.  Fresh ingredient is the key to have a real Thai cooking flavor.  Don’t risk your wonderful flavor for substitute or dried ingredients.

    If you love to have a kaffir lime leave tree, check out the Home Depot or you local nursery places or you can order it online if you have access to internet.

    To learn more about the important of kaffir lime leaves and their fruits, please refer to the kaffir lime leaves page.

    com mentioned in the NYtimes.com

    I am thankful to David Tanis for mentioned my website kaffirlimeleaves.com in the nytimes.com today.  By the way, he wrote a wonderful blog about the kaffir lime leaves as well as their fruits.  Here is the link to the blog.

    Of course, you find a lot of them and other kinds of citrus in  Southeast Asia .  The fruits and leaves are very useful for cooking and other home remedies.  You can use the rinds for cooking too, but you don’t want to leaves them  in the pot so long.  They would give a bitter taste if you eat them.  You might want to pick them up after a few minutes in the pot.  Some folks, especially women,  use the rinds for having a great looking skin.  The fruit juice can be used to shampoo your hair.  It leaves a clean and soft texture.  For the salad and the fish cake, young kaffir lime leaves are preferred.

    Even though some cooking recipes mentioned that you can substitute the kaffir lemon leaves with lemon grass or lemon grass mixed with lime zest.  They are not even close  because the fragrance is total different.  It is unique and one of a kind.

    Keep in mind though the fresh kaffir lime leaves are much better than dried kaffir lime leaves.  Those dried ones tend to lose the fragrance which is important in Thai cooking.  You can use them for substitute, but not quite like the fresh ones.  Fresh ingredient is the key to have a real Thai cooking flavor.  Don’t risk your wonderful flavor for substitute or dried ingredients.

    If you love to have your own kaffir lime leave tree, check out the Home Depot or you local nursery places or you can order it online if you have access to internet.

    To learn more about the important of kaffir lime leaves and their fruits, please refer to the kaffir lime leaves page.

     

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    Kaffir lime leaves: Hot and Spicy Chicken Soup

    Ingredients

    hot and spicy chicken soup3 stalks lemongrass, bottom 6″ only

    4 cups water or chicken broth

    3 Kaffir lime leaves

    1 lb. chicken breasts

    1/4 cup + 2 Tbs. fish sauce

    1/4 cup + 2 Tbs. lime juice

    3 Serrano chiles (to your liking)

    ½ cup cilantro

    Preparation

    1. Slice the lemon grass in half, lengthwise. Crush the slices with a knife or cleaver and put them in a saucepan with the water or chicken broth and Kaffir lime leaves.

    2. Chop the chicken into 3/4″ pieces, leaving the bones for flavor or removing them. Set aside.

    3. Bring the water or chicken broth with the lemon grass and Kaffir lime leaves to a gentle boil and boil for 5 minutes, covered. Add the chicken and fish sauce and boil gently, covered, until the chicken is done, around 15 minutes.

    4. Remove from heat and add the lime juice.

    5. Remove the stems, but not the seeds, from the chiles, Crush the chiles with a side of a cleaver or large knife until they split in several places.  Add them to the soup and stir.  Garnish with cilantro and serve with rice.

    Courtesy of “Thai Home Cooking from Kamolmal’s Kitchen”, by William Crawford & Kamolmal Pootaraksa

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    Curry: Panang Curry with Beef

    panang curry with beefIngredients

    2 lbs beef chuck or rump roast

    Marinade ingredients

    1 tbsp fish soy sauce

    1 tbsp red wine

    2 cups coconut milk

    1/4 cup coconut cream

    21/2 tbsp panang curry paste

    2 tbsps fish sauce

    2 tbsps  sugar

    5 mixed fresh green and red chili peppers, seeded and cut lengthwise into 4 pieces

    Garnish

    1 fresh kaffir lime leaf, cut into fine slivers

    Preparation

    Cut the meat into very thin bite-sized pieces. Marinate the cut meat in a 1 tbsp fish sauce and 1 tbsp red wine for 10 minutes.

    Place the 2 cups of coconut milk in a saucepan and bring it barely to a boil.  Add the marinated meat and cook for 15 minutes or until the meat is tender.

    Place the 1/4 cup of coconut cream in a frying pan over medium heat and mix in the curry paste.  Stir until the curry releases its aroma.  Pour this mixture over the meat.

    Mix in the 2 tbsps fish sauce, sugar, and chili pepper.  Heat the mixture up.  Place in a serving dish and sprinkle with the kaffir lime leaf.  Serve with steam rice.

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